THE CHANNEL DASH - Framed Collectors Piece

by Robert Taylor

Editions Edition Size US($) QTY
Framed collectors piece $2795.00
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At dawn on 12 February 1942 a German battle fleet rounded the Cherbourg peninsula. Their destination was Germany.

Undetected, the battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, together with the cruiser Prinz Eugen and supporting vessels, had escaped from the French port of Brest, and were making an audacious dash – in broad daylight and under the noses of the enemy – to the safety of the Elbe Estuary. But first they must sail through the Straits of Dover, one of the narrowest and most heavily defended straits in the world.

Everything depended on surprise – and air cover. Given the job of providing that air cover was one of Hitler’s youngest Generals, Adolf Galland, and his Me109’s of JG-26. That a commander of only 29 years old was given such responsibility and personally by the Führer speaks volumes for the esteem in which Galland was held by the German High Command.

Originally published in 1996, this classic Masterwork has become one of the most collectible limited editions ever released.

We’re delighted to have ONE COPY ONLY!

Framed to full conservation standards to include Kriegsmarine Eagle patch and Luftwaffe Wings, the print is personally signed by the artist, plus veterans who took part in Operation Cerberus:

  • Generalleutnant Adolf Galland KC with Oak Leaves Swords and Diamonds
  • Major Gerhard Schopfel KC
  • Korvettekapitän Friedrich-Karl Paul
  • Oberleutnant Adolf Glunz KC WITH OAK LEAVES
  • Oberleutnant-zur-see Gerd-dietrich Schneider
Media:
Framed Prints
Size:
36.75 x 29.25 inches

Shipping available on this item

Prices listed on framed items do not include shipping. If you purchase this item, we'll contact you to discuss shipping costs.